Kimber Hunter – Custom Rifle on a Budget

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Posted September 6, 2016 by Dan Turvey, Jr. in Gear

Kimber6.5Creedmoor5

What would you be willing to pay for a rifle that has a sub-MOA guarantee, weighs 6.5 lbs., sports a match-grade chamber with a Mauser claw extractor, Model-70 three-position safety, pillar bedded stock and detachable box magazine? $1,000? $1,500? That seems to be the going rate for a rifle with such features nowadays. Kimber has stepped into the market in a big way with their new Hunter rifle wearing a price tag around $800. You can’t beat these features with any other production rifle out there at this price point.

Kimber sent me one to test, chambered in what I think is the best caliber a high country mule deer hunter could ask for, the 6.5 Creedmoor. Topped with a Leupold VX-3 4.5-14x40MM, you have more than enough to reach out and touch a trophy buck across a rugged canyon. I ran Hornady’s Precision Hunter 143 grain ELD-X through it and was greeted with an amazing three-shot group slightly bigger than a ½”, well within the sub-MOA guarantee.

After sighting in 3” high at 100 yards, I proceeded to hammer some kill-zone sized steel plates out to 400 yards with ease. This gun makes it almost too easy. Everyone in the office, without exception, that picked the rifle up immediately commented on how comfortable the stock is, not only in the hand but on the shoulder as well. Sight alignment is a non-issue, even for some smaller statured shooters.

So where does the value engineering come in to play? If you are familiar with Kimber rifles, immediately noticeable is the stock material followed by the integral trigger guard. To pass some cost savings on to you, Kimber opted for the reinforced polymer stock instead of the Kevlar-Carbon fiber stock. It’s still extremely lightweight but the material is more cost efficient. The integral trigger guard also reduces labor and materials for an additional savings. Beyond that (from what I can tell) everything else is still the same as their other premium rifles.

I own the Kimber Montana, have hunted with the Mountain Ascent and shot the Hunter. I honestly can’t tell you there’s any difference in the shootability between them. They are all lights-out accurate, have extremely mild recoil and each exudes Kimber’s commitment to custom quality at an economical price. If you’re in the market for a new rifle this year, the Kimber Hunter should give you serious pause. Check out all of their chamberings at www.kimberamerica.com. You won’t be disappointed.


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About the Author

Dan Turvey, Jr.
Dan Turvey, Jr.


5 Comments


  1.  
    Pahuntnut

    Love my Montana in 25-06. These are terrific rifles, Just try finding a used one, that should tell you something.




  2.  
    Jim

    My concern is the18″barrel any comments?




  3.  
    Tom

    The only kimber that has an 18 inch barrel is the Adirondak. And like its name its best for eastern thick timber. The Hunter and Montana have 22 inch barrels




  4.  
    Janie

    This rifle sucks do not buy it. Had one shipped to me stock doesn’t fit the barrel doesn’t have equal gap on both sides. Company told me to shoot it and try and loosen the screws and re set is. But won’t warrenty the problem because the warranty only covers sub moa grouping. Horrible customer support and a junk rifle.




    •  
      PaTom

      sounds like you did not even shoot it? And i dont understand what your talking about regarding the warranty? Only covers sub moa groups? So if it does not shoot sub moa groups there is no warrenty??





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